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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in EPA

The EPA has proposed three new rules to create a new process of prioritizing and evaluating chemicals under the new Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

The new law requires the agency to evaluate chemicals grandfathered into that act. The recently proposed rules are aimed at helping the agency evaluate quickly those chemicals currently in the marketplace.

Read entire article - https://www.aiha.org/publications-and-resources/TheSynergist/Industry%20News/Pages/EPA-Proposes-Rules-for-Prioritizing,-Evaluating-Chemicals.aspx

Tagged in: chemicals EPA

The EPA has issued a final rule to limit exposure to formaldehyde, a carcinogen that is used as an adhesive in a broad range of wood products, including some furniture, flooring, cabinets, bookcases and building materials such as plywood and wood panels. Exposure to formaldehyde can cause adverse health effects including eye, nose and throat irritation, other respiratory symptoms and cancer. This is the first time the EPA has regulated formaldehyde - OSHA has a formaldehyde standard which is part of the federal government.

Read entire article - https://www.epa.gov/formaldehyde/formaldehyde-emission-standards-composite-wood-products-0

Tagged in: EPA

A non-profit organization has unveiled its new website that identifies the biggest environmental/health/safety violators in the United States since 2010.

The searchable database (Violation Tracker) and an accompanying report come from the Corporate Research Project of Good Jobs First. The database includes penalties from EPA, OSHA and 11 other federal agencies that deal with EHS issues.

Read entire article - http://www.goodjobsfirst.org/violation-tracker

Tagged in: EPA OSHA

The association has submitted a letter of support for legislation H.R. 3384.

The American Industrial Hygiene Association has submitted a letter of support for H.R. 3384, the "Quiet Communities Act of 2015." This legislation would reestablish and reauthorize funding for EPA's Office of Noise Abatement and Control.
According to AIHA's news release, the letter focuses on a 2014 study that estimated more than 104 million individuals in the United States had annual noise exposures at a level that increased their risk of noise-induced hearing loss and other noise-related health effects, such as cardiovascular disease, sleep disturbance, stress, general annoyance, and impaired learning and concentration.

AIHA says that the new legislation will also provide support for two other objectives of the 1972 Noise Control Act, including establishing a means for effective coordination of federal research and activities in noise control and providing information to the public regarding the noise emission and reduction characteristics of consumer products.

Read entire article - https://www.aiha.org/about-aiha/Press/2015PressReleases/Pages/AIHA-Submits-Letter-of-Support-for-Legislation-H.R.-3384.aspx

Tagged in: EPA noise measurement

We know that lead exposure can be harmful to our health, which leads us to ponder how it (along with other materials known to be hazardous, such as mercury and asbestos), could ever have been so widely used. The short answer is that its usefulness outweighed any known harmful effects then known. Today, we know that lead exposure can damage organs and the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. It also can be harmful in children’s development.

Most commonly, lead is inhaled as a dust or fume or is ingested accidentally. Because it can circulate throughout the body and be deposited in organs and bodily tissues, lead is considered a cumulative and persistent toxic substance.

When we think of lead exposure in everyday items, we often think of lead-based paint. Prior to the 1960s – and even up until the late 1970s – paint used in homes was most often lead based. Traditionally, lead oxide was used as a pigment. And because of their anti-bacterial and anti-mold properties, organic compounds, such as lead naphthenate, were used in house paints in small concentrations. The EPA established lead-based paint regulations in the 1990s after it was found that millions of children in the United States had been exposed to lead poisoning from paint peeling from walls.

Lead chromate continues to be used in applications such as primers for steel bridges and in the shipbuilding industry due to its anti-corrosion properties. Similarly, lead is still used in yellow highway paints in part for its resistance to the elements.

Whether at home or in the workplace, remodeling or renovation projects such as sanding, cutting with saws or torches, and demolition work can yield hazardous lead chips and dust by disturbing lead-based paint, resulting in an unhealthy environment. OSHA’s Lead Standard for the construction industry, Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations 1926.62, addresses lead in a various forms, including metallic lead, all inorganic lead compounds, and organic lead soaps. Workplace Safety & Health Co. Inc. can provide industry-standard testing for lead-based paint according to OSHA standards. Our industrial hygienists cover a wide breadth of workplace environmental concerns, from noise to air quality, from chemical exposure to asbestos and lead paint identification. We can identify and evaluate hazards, and develop corrective action plans to solve your industrial hygiene problems efficiently and economically.

Currently, there are two methods recognized by the EPA for testing paint: X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis and paint chip sampling with an analysis by an accredited laboratory. At Workplace Safety & Health, we go a step further by using AutoCAD drawings and photographs to show the location and appearance of each surface coating we analyze.

So, before beginning that next renovation or construction project that you suspect might result in lead exposure, give us a call first and know what you’re dealing with.

Posted by on in Uncategorized

October was National Indoor Air Quality Month, an observance aimed at drawing attention to the quality of the air we breathe at home and at work.

Studies conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency comparing the risks of environmental threats to public health list indoor air pollution from sources such as secondhand smoke, radon, organic compounds, and biological pollutants among the top five risks on a consistent basis.

In general, most indoor air quality problems in the workplace can be pinpointed to six main sources:
• Inadequate Ventilation – These problems involve lack of adequate fresh air and uneven distribution of fresh air within a structure.
• Humidity and Temperature – These concerns involve levels outside the normal range of human comfort.
• Inside Contamination – Possible sources of contamination include office equipment such as copy machines, office and cleaning supplies, and chemicals that are stored indoors.
• Outside Contamination – As the name suggests, this includes contaminants brought into a work environment, such through improper air intake or even changes in wind conditions (for example, vehicle exhaust fumes from a parking garage or loading dock drawn into a ventilation system).
• Microbial Contamination – This is typically associated with water leaks, water infiltration, increased humidity indoors, humidifiers, and contaminated ventilation ductwork – places that can harbor and encourage the growth of microbes.
• New Building Materials – The results from building materials that have just been installed (such as the familiar gas emissions from new carpeting). Such problems can be dissipated by increasing ventilation and typically resolve over time.

At Workplace Safety & Health Co., our primary concern is to help our customers reduce injuries and illnesses while promoting their profitability through sound health and safety management practices – and that includes helping to identify and manage safety and health risks posed by air quality. Whether your employees’ work environment is predominately indoors or outdoors, our consultants can solve your business's air quality exposures through monitoring, mapping, surveys and evaluations that include qualitative air contaminant hazard assessments, air monitoring, and quantitative air contaminant exposure assessment. So give us a call –and breathe easier.

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